"Posterity will owe everlasting thanks to John Brown for lifting up once more to the gaze of a nation grown fat and flabby on the garbage of lust and oppression, a true standard of heroic philanthropy, and each coming generation will pay its installment of the debt. . . . John Brown saw slavery through no mist or cloud, but in a light of infinite brightness, which left no one of its ten thousand horrors concealed." Frederick Douglass

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Saturday, July 24, 2010

John and Abe: Two Moments in 1859
“I say, then, in the first place, to the Kentuckians, that I am what they call, as I understand it, a "Black Republican." I think slavery is wrong, morally and politically. I desire that it should be no further spread in--these United States, and I should not object if it should gradually terminate in the whole Union.”
Excerpted from a speech at Cincinnati, Ohio, September 17, 1859
“I do myself feel in the least degraded by my imprisonment, my chains, or the near prospect of the gallows.  Men cannot imprison, or chain, or hang the soul.  I go joyfully in behalf of millions that 'have no rights' that this great and glorious, this Christian Republic 'is bound to respect.'   Strange change in morals, political as well as Christian, since 1776!  I look forward to other changes to take place in God's good time, fully believing that 'the fashion of this world passeth away.'” (1 Corinthians 7:31)
Excerpted from letter of John Brown to Thomas B. Musgrave, November 17, 1859
[The complete entry is available only in the forthcoming book, John Brown: Emancipator]

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